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dc.contributor.advisorCox, Gregory V.
dc.contributor.advisorHatch, William D., II
dc.contributor.authorDouangaphaivong, Thaveephone NMN.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:31:08Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2004-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/1272
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution in unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Littoral Combat Ship's (LCS) minimally manned core crew goal is 15 to 50 manpower requirements and the threshold, for both core and mission-package crews, is 75 to 110. This dramatically smaller crew size will require more than current technologies and past lessons learned from reduced manning initiatives. Its feasibility depends upon changes in policy and operations, leveraging of future technologies and increased Workload Transfer from sea to shore along with an increased acceptance of risk. A manpower requirements analysis yielded a large baseline (200) requirement to support a notional LCS configuration. Combining the common systems from the General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin designs with other assumed equipments (i.e. the combined diesel and gas turbine (CODAG) engineering plant) produce the notional LCS configuration used as the manpower requirements basis. The baseline requirement was reduced through the compounded effect of manpower savings from Smart Ship and OME and suggested paradigm shifts. A Battle Bill was then created to support the notional LCS during Conditions of Readiness I and III. An efficient force deployment regime was adopted to reduce the overall LCS class manpower requirement. The efficiency gained enables the LCS force to "flex" and satisfy deployment requirements with 25% to 30% fewer manpower requirements over the "one-forone" crewing concept. costs $60K.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/littoralcombatsh109451272
dc.format.extentxvi, 192 p. : ill. (some col.) ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLogistics, Navalen_US
dc.subject.lcshNaval art and scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleLittoral Combat Ship (LCS) manpower requirements analysisen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research
dc.subject.authorCrewingen_US
dc.subject.authorHuman Capitalen_US
dc.subject.authorLittoral Combat Shipen_US
dc.subject.authorLCSen_US
dc.subject.authorManningen_US
dc.subject.authorManpoweren_US
dc.subject.authorMinimal Manningen_US
dc.subject.authorOptimizationen_US
dc.subject.authorOptimalen_US
dc.subject.authorRequirementsen_US
dc.subject.authorComposite Sailoren_US
dc.subject.authorTechnology Leverageen_US
dc.subject.authorWorkload Transferen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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