Publication:
The Philippine Insurrection the U.S. Navy in a military operation other than war, 1899-1902

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Authors
Carlson, Ted W.
Subjects
Navy
Philippines
Insurrection
Gunboats
Guerilla Warfare
Blockade
Asymmetric Warfare
Pacification
Army
Advisors
Hagan, Kenneth J.
Date of Issue
2004-12
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
U.S. naval doctrine has been dominated by the Mahanian concept of massing large capital ships for over one hundred years. Yet, it was a Cyclone-class patrol craft, a USCG cutter, and an Australian frigate that pushed up the Khor-Abd-Allah waterway and opened up the port of Umm Qasr, Iraq, during the Second Gulf War. They continue to protect it and the surrounding oil infrastructure from attack from insurgents and terrorists today. With the navy's current interest in transformation, the question arises, is the navy as presently configured well suited for today's threats? This thesis explores the question of how should the navy meet threats to national interests. This is accomplished through historical analysis of an event that is similar to the situation today: The Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902). This episode showcases the shortcomings of the navy's conventional approach to military operations other than war, and the need for change. In today's asymmetric environment, the past provides insight into effective means for handling these types of threats. This thesis concludes that the navy needs to diversify itself to incorporate different ship platforms, platforms that incorporate the utility of old with the technology of new.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs
Other Units
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xiv, 205 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ;
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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