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dc.contributor.advisorLieberman, Gerald J.
dc.contributor.authorParent, Elias Alphonse
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-29T23:35:23Z
dc.date.available2012-08-29T23:35:23Z
dc.date.issued1965-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/13018
dc.description.abstractMany statistical procedures used and studied today are sequential in nature. By this we mean that the time when a statistical decision is reached is random. In contrast to such procedures are the fixed sample size procedures. Best known perhaps is sequential analysis and the sequential probability ratio test as formulated by Wald [6]. There are other sequential procedures, for example in process inspection schemes, where, based on a sequence of observations a decision is made to stop the process and take some adjusting action, the time at which the process is stopped being a random variable. There are many other sequential-like procedures.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.archive.org/details/sequentialrankin00pare
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherStanford Universityen_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematicsen_US
dc.titleSequential ranking proceduresen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.namePh.D.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorStanford Universityen_US


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