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dc.contributor.authorCarns, Neil S.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T22:54:51Z
dc.date.available2012-11-01T22:54:51Z
dc.date.issued1970-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/15003
dc.descriptionThis thesis document was issued under the authority of another institution, not NPS. At the time it was written, a copy was added to the NPS Library collection for reasons not now known.  It has been included in the digital archive for its historical value to NPS.  Not believed to be a CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) title.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe influence of history on foreign policy decisions is recognizable and demonstrable. The extent of this influence is described elusively at best. Often, the interpretation given to historical fact is more significant than the fact itself. To the degree that an historical concept is part of the decision-making process, the resultant events will become dependent upon past history. Thus decisions of causation are able to evoke trends of action or behavioral patterns that can become self-perpetuating or, in a less positive sense, at least reinforcing. On the other hand, if decisions are made intentionally to avert what is predicted to be an analogous situation, the repeatability or cyclic theory of history is broken. It is the success of this latter case which is the most difficult to substantiate: there is no convenient means of recording non-events.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/fareasternmunich00carn
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subject.lcshPolitical scienceen_US
dc.titleA Far Eastern Munich: appeasement by omission.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorUniversity of Washingtonen_US


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