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dc.contributor.advisorKleis, Russell
dc.contributor.authorMcGonigal, Richard Allin
dc.date1971
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T23:24:41Z
dc.date.available2012-11-13T23:24:41Z
dc.date.issued1971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/15812
dc.descriptionThis thesis document was issued under the authority of another institution, not NPS. At the time it was written, a copy was added to the NPS Library Collection for reasons not now known. It has been included in the digital archive for its historical value to NPS. Not believed to be a CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) title.
dc.description.abstractDrawing from the findings of Peace Corps trainers, military advisors and those agencies sponsoring personnel attempting cross cultural interaction overseas and/or domestically, this study sought to isolate the personal interaction variables having the most influence upon successful communication. These variables, in order of importance, were found to be: self awareness, empathy, tolerance for ambiguity, self esteem, low dogmatism, high regard for the value of equality, the ability to communicate non-verbally, genuineness, warmth and openness. Sampling from a population of Michigan State University, College of Education, students (n=288) interested in working in the inner city a ten-week training model was designed and tested for its effect upon 14 factors deemed to be important in interpersonal communication. The treatment consisted of an encounter group mode which included a series of human relations exercises. Instruments used to test the variables included: Rokeach ' s Value Inventory and D Scales, Hunt's Low Self Esteem Scale, the Truax Scales for Empathy, Genuineness, Warmth and Openness, Budner ' s Scale for Intolerance for Ambiguity, a congruity use of the Traux Scales for Self Awareness, and a non-verbal communication scale designed by the author. Treatment versus control group analyses and repeated measures analyses showed significant treatment effects. Those variables most sensitive to treatment were (in order of strength) : increased self awareness, reduced dogmatism, higher regard for the value of equality, increased empathy, increased self esteem and increased tolerance for ambiguity. An analysis of relationship between leadership style and group mean behavioral changes (using Wile's Group Therapy Questionnaire—Form C) showed no significant correlations between leadership style and group performance within this training model.
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/modelforcrosscul00mcgo
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMichigan State Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.titleA model for the cross cultural interaction training of adults.en_US
dc.title.alternativeNAen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMichigan State University
dc.contributor.departmentAdministration and Higher Education
etd.thesisdegree.namePh.D.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMichigan State Universityen_US


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