Hydrostatic pressure effects on 1/4 inch polypropylene line.

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Authors
Harder, Ronald Erwin.
Subjects
Advisors
Thornton, E.B.
Tucker, S.P.
Date of Issue
1972
Date
March 1972
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the mechanical properties of 1/4 inch polypropylene line were investigated. The line was exposed to hydrostatic pressures of 5,000 and 10,000 psi for periods of 6, 12, and 24 hours, respectively. Upon completion of the pressurization period, the line was removed from the pressure vessel and its ultimate tensile strength recorded and compared to that of the line before pressurization. There was an increase in the tensile strength of the line as pressure increased and time progressed, with a maximum increase of 3.1 percent occurring after pressurization at 10,000 psi for 12 hours and at 5,000 psi for 24 hours. Secondly, there was no measurable difference in the relative elongation of the line after pressurization as compared to that before pressurization. The mode of failure was investigated by testing individual line fibers. Microscopic observation after failure showed no discernible difference between the mode of failure before and after pressurization. In each case, the fibers presented a somewhat jagged edge and the outer portions of the fiber appeared to have peeled back.
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Naval Postgraduate School
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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