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dc.contributor.advisorOlsen, Edward A.
dc.contributor.advisorSwanland, Brian E.
dc.contributor.authorYildiz, Ahmet
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:33:06Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:33:06Z
dc.date.issued2005-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/1796
dc.description.abstractThis thesis evaluates Japanese geopolitical change in the post-Cold War era. It does so by analyzing Japan's history, its foreign policy since 1945, its reasons for becoming a normal country, and the impact of its normalization. This thesis makes three arguments. First, Japan, although its history is replete with internal rivalry and conflict, never displayed an aggressive foreign policy with expansionist and adventurist characteristics*with the exception of an insignificant expedition to Korea in the 1590s*before the Meiji Restoration. Second, Japan should become a normal country because it would advance Japan's regional leadership, increase the likelihood of Japan's accession to the United Nations Security Council as a permanent member, and improve its economy in both the short and the long run. Finally, no significant barrier stands against Japanese normalization; however, Japan must follow cautious and amicable relations with China and the two Koreas in order to achieve normalcy. In conclusion, the thesis makes policy recommendations for Japan and the United States regarding Japanese normalization.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/shouldjapbecomen109451796
dc.format.extentxii, 107 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshCold Waren_US
dc.subject.lcshGeopoliticsen_US
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen_US
dc.subject.lcshHistoryen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshLeadershipen_US
dc.titleShould Japan become a normal country?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.identifier.oclc63137080
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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