Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFuhs, Allen E.
dc.contributor.authorCole, Lonnie William
dc.dateDecember 1979
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T19:29:22Z
dc.date.available2012-11-16T19:29:22Z
dc.date.issued1979-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/18647
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractTo highlight in a qualitative manner the kinetics of an excimer laser, a simple computer model for calculating the species populations in a KrF laser cavity is developed; subsequently a computer program originally developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is modified to calculate the population of different electronic configurations of excited neon present in a XeF laser. When modified, the NRL program accounts for 185 reactions and requires 9.5 minutes of CPU time using the IBM 360-67. The populations obtained are applied to the calculation of the index of refraction in the laser cavity. the phase shift is determined per unit length for the two laser wavelengths; one laser wavelength is non-resonance with neon and the other is at resonance. Neon is the dominant specie relative to concentration and within the population distribution the neon ground state dominates by a factor of a million. The calculations show that the ground state neon determines the index of refraction; an exception occurs if the laser wavelength is near resonance to any of the transitions in the 3s . 4p array. As long as the laser is operated away from the 3s > 4p resonant wave-lengths, the phase shift will be negligibly small resulting in satisfactory beam quality; the preceding statement is valid only for the influence of neon.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis thesis prepared in conjunction with research supported in part by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) under Order no. 3747.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/computerprogramf00cole
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMechanical engineeringen_US
dc.titleComputer program for the kinetics and populations in a xenon fluoride laseren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMcNelley, Terry R.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.subject.authorExcimer laseren_US
dc.subject.authorLaser kineticsen_US
dc.subject.authorPopulation distributionsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Engineering Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineEngineering Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record