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dc.contributor.advisorMcGonigal, Richard A.
dc.contributor.authorFord, Jerry Wilson
dc.dateDecember 1980
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T21:01:54Z
dc.date.available2012-11-16T21:01:54Z
dc.date.issued1980-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/19057
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was undertaken to assess the impact of the organizational socialization process as it pertains to the Black male Navy officers. The intent is to examine whether that process unduly traumatizes these minority officers and to determine if there are factors in the process which might impact negatively upon the recruitment, employment and retention of Blacks and other minorities into the officer ranks. Through the use of interviews, archival data, and some necessary subjective evaluations, the impact of the socialization phenomenon was analyzed using the three stage model of socialization: anticipatory stage, entry stage, and adaption stage. This model is based upon that formulated by Dr. M. Louis. The results of this study suggest that barriers exist to the full adaption or acculturalization of Blacks into the officer corps and that these barriers are mostly hidden from both Blacks and Whites. These barriers, it is noted, have little to do with malice but rather are erected and perpetuated through a lack of cultural awareness and literacy on the part of both groups. This study further concludes that Blacks have failed to be fully absorbed into the cultural milieau of the predominantly White officer corps but may have formed a sub-group of differently acculturated officers. This latter premise would suggest that the positive utilization of Black officers leaves much to be desired. The implication of these findings around the issues of women and other minorities entering the officer ranks along with recommendations for reducing these barriers to adequate socialization are included in the conclusion of this study.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/socializationofb00ford
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshManagementen_US
dc.titleSocialization of Black Naval officers (Black officers experience a more traumatic socialization process upon entering the Navy than do their White peers due to certain differences between the broader Black and White subcultural socialization processen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderHarris, Reuben T.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentAdministrative Science
dc.subject.authorblack officersen_US
dc.subject.authorblack socializationen_US
dc.subject.authorminority officersen_US
dc.subject.authorminority socializationen_US
dc.subject.authorsocializationen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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