Publication:
Determinants of quit behavior among managerial and professional women

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Authors
Arrowood, Jacquelyn M. Y
Subjects
Advisors
Solnick, Loren M.
Date of Issue
1986
Date
December 1986
Publisher
Language
eng
Abstract
This thesis examines the effects of personal, human capital and job related characteristics on the quit decision of managerial or professional level women. In addition, perceptual or equity factors, such as crowding within grade level and functional area, relative time to promotion and pay compared to others in the firm, were modeled. The micro-data are from the personnel files of a large manufacturing firm. Three types of analysis were conducted. The first was a logit analysis of a cross-sectional sample of the managerial/professional women in this firm. The second was a logit analysis of a pooled cohort sample of these women, during their second full year after hire. The third examination of the data used proportional hazard analysis, compensating for the selection bias, due to censored data, inherent in quit studies. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the three techniques are discussed. Empirical results of the proportional hazards model show that such job related factors as recent promotion, salary, grade level and favorable performance ratings significantly reduce quits, with promotion having the strongest effect. Personal factors such as marriage and children also reduce the managerial/professional woman's propensity to quit.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Administrative Sciences
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NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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