Publication:
North Pacific tropical cyclones and teleconnections

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Authors
Budzko, David C.
Subjects
Tropical cyclones
Summertime telecommunications
Advisors
Chang, C.-P.
Date of Issue
2005-03
Date
March 2005
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis investigated the hypothesis that variations in tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the western North Pacific (WNP) may affect the teleconnection between the tropical WNP and North America. The teleconnection patterns of the 500 hPa geopotential height between a base point in the WNP (20 N 115 E) and a domain over North America (30 - 45 N, 70 -90 W) from 1951-2001 were examined. The 25 most active and the 25 least active TC years for two regions with the highest climatological average of TC activity, near the Philippines and Taiwan, respectively, were compared to determine if stronger teleconnection patterns occur during the more active years. For both regions, the correlation pattern is significant during active years and insignificant during inactive years, with the results based on TC activity in the Philippines region showing a larger difference. An analysis of 500 hPa mean winds showed weaker winds in the midlatitudes during active TC years when the teleconnection is stronger, which suggests that the teleconnection may consist mainly of Lau and Weng's (2000) zonally-elongated mode (Mode 1). Further cross correlations of the geopotential height and TC frequency parameters with the tropical eastern and western Pacific sea-surface temperatures (SST's) showed a significant correlation between TC activity and tropical eastern Pacific SST's, but the North America-WNP correlation is unlikely to be a result of a direct influence of SST's on the two regions.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Department of Meteorology
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xiv, 54 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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