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dc.contributor.advisorBuss, Claude A.
dc.contributor.authorJagoe, Donald Alan
dc.dateJune 1986
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T00:18:33Z
dc.date.available2012-11-27T00:18:33Z
dc.date.issued1986-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/22160
dc.description.abstractIn November of 1985, Ferdinand Marcos, President of the Republic of the Philippines, announced that he would hold a 'snap' Presidential election. This election took place on 7 February, 1986, in a highly charged atmosphere of partisan politics marked by intimidation, widespread poll irregularities and intense domestic and foreign scrutiny. The United States official position remained fluid in an attempt to balance U.S. strategic and economic national interests with those of the Filipino people. The essential Philippine national interest at stake was the viability of the democratic process as an expression of the will of a free people. Following a hotly disputed count the incumbent President Marcos claimed victory, a move similarly taken by his opposition opponent, Mrs. Corazon Aquino. The resulting civil strife threatened peace in the Philippines and posed significant questions for U.S. foreign policy, specifically, the relative priority of democratic values vis a vis strategic interests and the role of the United States in mitigating the rise of a communist insurgency there. This is a case study of the development of that election and the role that the United States did and could have played in it. Additionally, it examines the national interests of both countries as expressed during and after the election.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/turmoiltransitio1094522160
dc.format.extent163 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.subject.lcshNational security affairsen_US
dc.titleTurmoil, transition...triumph? The democratic revolution in the Philippines.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderTeti, Frank M.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorPhilippinesen_US
dc.subject.authorMarcosen_US
dc.subject.authorAquinoen_US
dc.subject.authorpresidential electionen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navy
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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