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dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Lyman
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, John
dc.contributor.authorNewberry, David A.
dc.dateMarch 2005
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:33Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2228
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSince 1988, democracy in Taiwan has evolved and developed a great deal. Experts argue whether this growth constitutes "democratic consolidation" but there is no contention of the idea that the ROC is more democratic now versus pre-1988. In addition, public opinion polls show that the populace view themselves very differently in 2004 than they did in 1988 in terms of their national identity and their preferences for mainland relations. Finally, the democratic period in Taiwan witnessed greater hostility between the PRC and ROC than in the preceding thirty years combined. This heightened level of belligerence has subsided in recent years, but still remains a Sword of Damocles hanging over each step of Taiwan's democratic process. With these facts in mind, it is clear that the addition of ROC democratization has destabilized relations between the China and Taiwan. One should note that Taiwan's political liberalization has not damned cross-strait relations to a cataclysmic fate. As noted many times in this essay there are prospects for hope and increased cooperation. However, with the advent of democracy for the first time in an ethnically Chinese society, relations moved from a fairly stable equilibrium to a somewhat chaotic new reality resplendent with uncertainty and ripe for catastrophic miscalculation.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/democraticchaosh109452228
dc.format.extentviii, 73 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDemocracyen_US
dc.subject.lcshTaiwanen_US
dc.subject.lcshPublic opinionen_US
dc.titleDemocratic chaos: how Taiwanese democracy destabilized cross-strait relationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorTaiwanen_US
dc.subject.authorPRCen_US
dc.subject.authorROCen_US
dc.subject.authorCross-strait relationsen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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