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dc.contributor.advisorPorch, Douglas R.
dc.contributor.authorMushtare, Jeremy S.
dc.dateMarch 2005
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:33Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2229
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractPsychological operations (PSYOP) forces should undertake significant doctrinal, training, and operational reforms to ensure the viability of support provided to U.S. led stabilization and reconstruction efforts. Such operations involve increased civilmilitary interactions and necessitate effective cross-cultural communications with not only the indigenous populace, but a host of transnational actors as well. Today's PSYOP training is reflective of a persisting "Cold War mentality" that fails to adequately prepare soldiers for effective post-conflict situations such as the reunification of the Korean peninsula, whether brought about either through a renewal of combat operations or the result of diplomatic means. Meanwhile, North Korea's formidable and adept propaganda machine has persisted in isolating its populace from external influences for more than a halfcentury. Post-Korean War generation North Koreans have been successfully indoctrinated since birth to despise the United States. Furthermore, anti-U.S. sentiment has been on the rise in South Korea for a number of years. Under the current training model, contemporary psychological operations forces are ill-prepared to conduct effective operations in an environment involving two-way, face-to-face communications such as those required while stabilizing and reconstructing a nation. The case of Korean reunification serves as an extreme scenario that nevertheless depicts the drastic need for improvements in the capabilities of modern PSYOP forces.en_US
dc.format.extentxii, 130 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPsychological warfareen_US
dc.subject.lcshKorean reunification question (1945- )en_US
dc.subject.lcshNation-buildingen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshKoreaen_US
dc.subject.lcshSpecial forces (Military science)en_US
dc.titlePSYOP in stabilization and reconstruction operations: preparing for Korean reunificationen_US
dc.title.alternativePreparing for Korean reunificationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderOlsen, Edward A.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorPsychological operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorPSYOPen_US
dc.subject.authorPsychological warfareen_US
dc.subject.authorPSYWARen_US
dc.subject.authorPsychological operations networksen_US
dc.subject.authorStabilization and reconstructionen_US
dc.subject.authorPost-conflict reconstructionen_US
dc.subject.authorKorean unificationen_US
dc.subject.authorNorth Korean propagandaen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial capitalen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in Security Studies (Stabilization and Reconstruction)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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