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dc.contributor.advisorKocher, Kathryn
dc.contributor.advisorMutty, John
dc.contributor.authorPierre, Karine O.
dc.dateMarch 2005
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:34Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:34Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2234
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to explore the effect of increased operational tempo on the retention behavior of Navy Hospital Corpsmen in pay grades E1-E6. Two data files were obtained from the Defense Manpower Data Center, one for first term personnel on active duty on September 1, 1998 who were eligible to reenlist/separate prior to September 11, 2001 and another for those on active duty on September 11, 2001 who were eligible to reenlist/separate prior to March 2004. The two groups differed significantly in demographics and military background characteristics. A logistic regression model incorporating individual and organizational factors affecting retention was estimated for each group. Model results indicate that personnel who have been deployed regardless of whether they were assigned to sea or shore type duty and regardless of the frequency of deployments are more likely to remain on active duty than those assigned to shore type duty and who have not deployed. Additionally, willingness to serve appears to intensify during periods of conflict. Women were significantly more likely to reenlist than men in 2001; this was not the case in 1998. The effects of occupational specialty also differed between the two periods.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/effectofincrease109452234
dc.format.extentxii, 77 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEmployee retentionen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleEffect of increased operational tempo (post 9/11) on the retention rate of hospital corpsmenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.schoolGraduate School of Business and Public Policy
dc.subject.authorRetentionen_US
dc.subject.authorOperational tempoen_US
dc.subject.authorEnlisteden_US
dc.subject.authorHospital corpsmenen_US
dc.subject.authorTurnoveren_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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