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dc.contributor.advisorTritten, James John
dc.contributor.authorMobley, Arthur Scott, Jr.
dc.contributor.authorTritten, James John.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T00:27:58Z
dc.date.available2012-11-27T00:27:58Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/22657
dc.description.abstractWar games are currently enjoying a revival of interest and popularity within the American defense community. Strategists, analysts and policy-makers alike are turning more and more to gaming as a medium for education, planning and discovery. This thesis invesitgates the nature, utility and limitations of strategic-level war gaming as a tool for strategic planning and international negotiations. It offers a perspective on gaming different (yet complementary) to that of operatioins research: war games are viewed as sources of synthetic history, to be studied and interpreted by historical-type methods. Thesesen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/beyondblackboxns1094522657
dc.format.extent94 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational security affairsen_US
dc.titleBeyond the black box: an assessment of strategic war gaming.en_US
dc.title.alternativeNAen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderNA
dc.contributor.corporateNA
dc.contributor.schoolNA
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorNAen_US
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.identifier.oclcocm640018176
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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