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dc.contributor.advisorOlsen, Edward A.
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, H. Lyman
dc.contributor.authorHight, Robert Frank, Jr.
dc.dateMarch 2005
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:42Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:42Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2272
dc.description.abstractSince taking office in 2001, Japanese Prime Minister Koizumi has pressed for greater expansion to the mission of the Japan Self Defense Force (JSDF), first by endorsing deployments in support of counter-terrorism operations in the Indian Ocean, and eventually the domestically unpopular decision to deploy to Iraq. Recently, an update to the 1996 National Defense Program Outline was published that accelerated the shift in the mission of the JSDF away from a pure self-defense force capable of operating with the United States in defense of Japan's sovereignty to that of an internationally recognized force capable of conducting operations in varying environments throughout the globe. Japan's accelerated military involvement in world affairs has provoked concerns among neighbors, whose perceptions are often quite different from those of the United States or Japan. Japan's legacy of militarism has created resistance to change among regional partners. In order for changes to succeed without upsetting the regional balance of power, Japan must improve not only the capability, but also the international trust and standing of the JSDF. This thesis provides information to allow policy makers to better understand the challenges that the Government of Japan faces in response to changes in security strategy.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/reshapingswordnd109452272
dc.format.extentxiv, 102 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBalance of poweren_US
dc.titleReshaping the sword and chrysanthemum: regional implications of expanding the mission of the Japan Self Defense Forcesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorSelf-defense forceen_US
dc.subject.authorJSDFen_US
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorNorth Koreaen_US
dc.subject.authorSouth Koreaen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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