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dc.contributor.advisorGiraldo, Jeanne K.
dc.contributor.advisorTrinkunas, Harold A.
dc.contributor.authorMelendez, Manuel Roberto.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:46Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:46Z
dc.date.issued2001-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2291
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the actions of democratically elected leaders perceived to create threats to democracy. These leaders are often political outsiders who come to power after established politicians and the "traditional" way of conducting democratic politics have been discredited. Once in power, some of their actions are seen as nonconforming with established democratic norms. This thesis investigates the areas where setbacks and major threats to democracy have occurred in Venezuela and how the international community might respond most effectively to such threats. This thesis advances four definitions of democracy drawn from the relevant literature, delegative, liberal, and substantive. It then examines the actions of the government on the different dimensions of democracy set forth by those definitions, elections, human rights and civil liberties, checks and balances, and militarism. Although the Chavez regime conforms to the minimal conditions of an electoral democracy, it is shown to fall short of accepted standards of liberal democracy. It also falls short of the vision of participative democracy advanced by President Chavez himself. This thesis concludes by offering policy recommendations on how to deal with these regimes.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/challengestodemo109452291
dc.format.extentxvii, 110 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleChallenges to democracy in Latin America : the case of Venezuela under Hugo Chavezen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.serviceUS Army (USA) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclc258905
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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