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dc.contributor.advisorCroissant, Aurel S.
dc.contributor.authorDilag, Bayani C.
dc.dateMarch 2005
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:34:46Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:34:46Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2292
dc.description.abstractIn pursuit of the objectives of the U.S. National Security Strategy and the National Military Strategy, the U.S. Armed Forces require access to military and logistics facilities overseas to be able to support and sustain its combat power projection. Access to these places translates into capabilities. An American military forward presence in time of peace as well as during a regional crisis lends credibility to U.S. diplomacy. Moreover, access to forward locations is expedient when engaging transnational threats or supporting humanitarian missions, e.g., the South and Southeast Asia tsunami relief operations. This thesis analyzes the political opposition to U.S. military presence in Thailand and the Philippines. The historical context that led to the development of this opposition is examined in detail. The rationale of those who oppose, as well as those who support, American military presence is clearly delineated. By understanding the sensitive political issues, U.S. military planners and operators can adapt base access strategies according to the existing political climate in these two countries. The politics unique to each environment will dictate the combination of "basing" approaches tailored to meet the U.S. military objectives as well as the public diplomacy required to support them.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/accessissuesssoc109452292
dc.format.extentx, 107 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAccess issues associated with U.S. military presence in Thailand and the Philippinesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMiller, H. Lyman
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorU.S.-Thai relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S.- Philippines relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorPublic diplomacyen_US
dc.subject.authorForward presenceen_US
dc.subject.authorAccess strategyen_US
dc.subject.authorRadicalismen_US
dc.subject.authorLeftist nationalismen_US
dc.subject.authorRightist nationalismen_US
dc.subject.authorMuslim nationalismen_US
dc.subject.authorAnti-Americanen_US
dc.subject.authorAnti-U.S.en_US
dc.subject.authorPropagandaen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited fronten_US
dc.subject.authorUSPACOMen_US
dc.subject.authorTheater securityen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary basesen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary presenceen_US
dc.subject.authorBasing strategiesen_US
dc.subject.authorPolitical mobilizationen_US
dc.subject.authorDemocratizationen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor (Select), United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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