Minority perceptions of opportunities and intentions to stay in the Navy

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Authors
Diaz, Mary L.
Subjects
Manpower
Retention and quality of life (QoL
Personnel attrition
Equal opportunity/diversity studies
Manpower policy issues/special studies
Advisors
Kocher, Kathryn
Eitelberg, Mark J.
Date of Issue
2005-03
Date
March 2005
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis investigates how perceptions of military opportunities affect the intentions of racial/ethnic minorities to remain in the U.S. Navy. The study uses responses of Navy personnel on the 1996 Armed Forces Equal Opportunity Survey to assess minority perceptions of equal opportunity. Logistic regression models are developed for male and female enlisted personnel and officers to determine the relationship between perceptions that opportunities are better in the military and the decision to stay on active duty or leave the Navy. The results of the quantitative analysis show that the positive perceptions about training opportunities and quality of life were significant most often, across all racial/ethnic groups and models. Further, the results show that, among racial/ethnic groups, blacks were most strongly influenced by perceptions in their retention plans. It is recommended that further research examine the relationship between racial/ethnic group and job assignments, or selection, along with the corresponding impact on perceptions and the effect of visible versus non-visible minority status on views of equal opportunity in the military.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xiv, 229 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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