The impact of group technology-based shipbuilding methods on naval ship design and acquisition practices

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Heffron, John Sutherland
Subjects
Advisors
Marcus, Henry S.
Sullivan, Paul E.
Date of Issue
1988
Date
Publisher
Language
en_US
Abstract
Modern shipbuilding practices in the United States have evolved from the requirement to build naval ships as economically as possible while still retaining the desired level of quality and the ability to fulfill naval mission requirements. The highly competitive environment that shipbuilders are now in has further stimulated their search for more efficient and productive ship construction methods. As a result, group technology-based shipbuilding methods have been developed and implemented over the last few years. These new construction technologies have profound effects on the manner in which naval ship acquisition is, or should be, conducted. In particular, there are serious consequences regarding engineering and design, (Computer aided design/manufacturing), ship work breakdown structures, and cost and schedule control systems. A brief history of naval ship design and acquisition practices, leading to a description of the current shipbuilding technologies, is given. Then the effects these technologies have on the above-mentioned areas of the naval ship acquisition process are described. Included are detailed examples of how modern shipbuilding methods have affected selected naval ship acquisition programs. Keyword: Theses. (KR)
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
148 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
Collections