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dc.contributor.advisorTollefson, Scott D.
dc.contributor.authorBedingfield, Robin Claire
dc.dateDecember 1992
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T16:14:59Z
dc.date.available2012-11-29T16:14:59Z
dc.date.issued1992-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/23722
dc.description.abstractThis thesis assesses the future of Mexican civil-military relations. Mexico is unique among Latin American nations for its professionalized and depoliticized military. While the Mexican Armed Forces have shunned an active role in politics since 1940, they continue to relay on the hegemonic political party, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional, or PRI, for power and prestige. This dictates a close and mutually-supportive working relationship. Within the next 20 years, however, the PRI is likely to lose its hegemonic position to increasing political opposition, severely straining the military's 60-year tradition of loyalty to both Constitution and party. The military will be pressured to take on a more dynamic political role with the demise of its long-standing patron. This thesis demonstrates that the Mexican Armed Forces are likely to resist this temptation to repoliticize.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/themexicmilitary1094523722
dc.format.extent113 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Mexican military and political transitionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderEyre, Dana P.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorMexicoen_US
dc.subject.authorCivil-military relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorLatin Americaen_US
dc.subject.authorPolitical transitionen_US
dc.subject.authorDemocratizationen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S.-Mexican relationsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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