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dc.contributor.advisorMurphree, James Thomas
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Grant Alexander, IV
dc.dateDecember 1992
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T16:15:08Z
dc.date.available2012-11-29T16:15:08Z
dc.date.issued1992-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/23737
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe upper equatorial Pacific Ocean response to anomalous westerly wind forcing during the 1991-92 El Nino was examined using observed oceanographic and atmospheric data from equatorial moorings and the Navy's operational atmospheric analyses. A strong 30-60 day signal was observed in the zonal winds and is mainly a result of westerly wind events. The local response to anomalous westerly winds differed between the western and eastern equatorial Pacific. In the western Pacific, westerly wind events tended to produce rapid decreases in sea surface temperatures (SST) (up to 1 degree C). There decreases were followed several days later by SST increases due to horizontal warm water advection and downwelling. In the central and eastern equatorial Pacific, westerly wind events were expressed mainly as weakenings of the easterlies. These weakenings caused decreases in equatorial upwelling and SST increases Westerly wind events in the western Pacific were also associated with large thermocline temperature fluctuations (on the order of 10 degrees C) in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. These fluctuations propagated eastward at phase speeds consistent with first baroclinic equatorial Kelvic wave dynamics (i.s., 2.0 - 3.5 ms-1). The ocean temperature fluctuations indicate wide wavelengths (about 15 X 10(3)km), with periods of 30-60 days.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/observationalstu00coop
dc.format.extent103 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleAn observational study of the local and remote response of the equatorial Pacific to westerly wind events during the 1991-92 El Ninoen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderChu, Peter C.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Meteorology
dc.subject.authorEl Ninoen_US
dc.subject.authorWesterly wind burstsen_US
dc.subject.authorEquatorial air-sea interactionsen_US
dc.subject.authorOcean Kelvin wavesen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMeteorology and Physical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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