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dc.contributor.advisorRightmire, Brandon G.
dc.contributor.authorBrook, James Byron
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-26T23:08:12Z
dc.date.available2012-12-26T23:08:12Z
dc.date.issued1954-05-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/24731
dc.description.abstractWhat is seen as a smooth surface is, on the microscopic level, rough and irregular. Two contacting surfaces are in contact only at the peaks of their surface asperities. The friction force between the two surfaces is thought to be as that force arising from the shear strength of the randomly located islands of contact. It is seen that if a thin film of a soft material is deposited on a hard substrate, the friction force will be small. In this investigation a thin film of neoprene was deposited on an annulus machine on one face of an aluminum disk. This annulus was then pressed against a roughened glass surface and rotated concentrically in a plane parallel to the glass. Rotation was accomplished by applying a tangential weight to the disk which was subjected to a fixed normal load. The speed of rotation was varied by varying the tangential load, and the friction test was carried out in an atmosphere of dry air, the temperature of which could be varied.
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/frictionofthinfi1094524731
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshChemistryen_US
dc.titleFriction of thin films of rubber-like materialen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Coast Guard (U.S.C.G.) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclcocn640306276
etd.thesisdegree.nameDegree of Naval Engineeren_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelProfessional Degreeen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNaval Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US


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