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dc.contributor.authorBellavita, Christopher
dc.date2011-09
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T16:26:38Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T16:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2011-09
dc.identifier.citationHomeland Security Affairs (September 2011), v.7 no.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/24990
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Homeland Security Affairs (September 2011), v.7 no.2en_US
dc.description.abstract"Christopher Bellavita discusses twelve proverbs -- accepted truths -- that have characterized the homeland security narrative. He contends that in the haste to establish a homeland security enterprise and create new policies and strategies, many homeland security proverbs may be inaccurate; they 'distort the homeland security narrative in a way that inhibits the search for more effective ideas to protect the nation.' Bellavita sees an opportunity over the next ten years for academics and strategists 'to take another look at the basic assumptions underpinning our homeland security narrative, and identify evidence that supports or refutes the proverbs used to guide strategic direction.'"en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.publisherCenter for Homeland Defense and Securityen_US
dc.titleHow Proverbs Damage Homeland Securityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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