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dc.contributor.authorSu, Yee San
dc.date2011-12
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T16:26:39Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T16:26:39Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.citationHomeland Security Affairs (December 2011), v.7, article 17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/24995
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Homeland Security Affairs (December 2011), v.7, article 17en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom the article's abstract: "Previous failures in effective, large-scale disaster response (e.g., Hurricane Katrina) are often traced to failures in effective coordination. As evidenced in after-action reports, however, assessments of coordination performance are still largely anecdotal in nature. Network analysis is a possible means to develop quantitative metrics for coordination assessment. In this paper, two techniques are proposed for characterizing coordination performance. First, Borgatti's technique for quantifying network fragmentation was used to measure the extent to which various response agencies play a role in establishing efficient communications. Second, Girvan and Newman's technique for community sub-group identification was used to identify potential breakdowns in information transfer. Both techniques were successfully implemented in a case-study analysis of the Top Officials 4 exercise. The techniques can provide additional insights into coordination performance, identifying exercise artificialities and allowing meta-analysis of coordination performance (e.g., over time, across regions, for different event scales)."en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.publisherCenter for Homeland Defense and Securityen_US
dc.rightsThe copyright of all articles published in Homeland Security Affairs rests with the author[s] of the articles. Any commercial use of Homeland Security Affairs or the articles published herein is expressly prohibited without the written consent of the copyright holder. Anyone can copy, distribute, or reuse these articles as long as the author and original source are properly cited.en_US
dc.titleApplication of Social Network Analysis Methods to Quantitatively Assess Exercise Coordinationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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