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dc.contributor.authorChipuk, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Kirby
dc.contributor.authorMazzitelli, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorStraight, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorReaves, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorChamberlin, Sara
dc.date2012-05
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T16:26:42Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T16:26:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationHomeland Security Affairs (May 2012), supplement 5, article 5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/25006
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Homeland Security Affairs (May 2012), supplement 5, article 5en_US
dc.description.abstract"Self-curing polysiloxane polymers have been developed for the forensic collection of latent signatures of explosives, organophosphates, and chemical warfare agent (CWA) degradation products. These polymeric materials penetrate the sample substrate as viscous liquids and subsequently harden to a semi-soft solid that can be peeled away from the substrate to extract signatures via the noncovalent interaction of the newly formed polymeric material with the analytes buried within the substrate. This paper discusses experiments aimed at altering the chemical and physical properties of the polysiloxane sampling materials to optimize signature recovery from porous substrates. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the collection of target analytes from within concrete. The recovery of these signatures using the self curing polymeric formulations is compared to current operational sampling alternatives such as adhesive fingerprint lifters and swabs. Demonstration of the preparation, extraction, and analytical methods for the detection of the target analytes is also presented."en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.publisherCenter for Homeland Defense and Securityen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleTunable, Self-curing Polymers for the Forensic Collection of Latent Signatures from Within Porous Materialsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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