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dc.contributor.authorKilroy, Richard
dc.date2007-09
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T16:27:01Z
dc.date.available2013-01-03T16:27:01Z
dc.date.issued2007-09-00
dc.identifier.citationHomeland Security Affairs (2007), Supplement no. 1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/25102
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Homeland Security Affairs (2007), Supplement no. 1en_US
dc.description.abstractDr. Richard J. Kilroy, Jr.en_US
dc.description.abstractVirginia Military Institute, USA, explores the concept of building regional security cooperation between the nations of North America, examining the history of security cooperation between the three nations in light of previous threats and explaining that there were limits to security 'friendship' due to differing threat perceptions, particularly between the United States and Mexico. He looks at the U.S. response to 9/11 and the formation of the U.S. Northern Command, in particular, and the impact this new military command has on U.S. security cooperation with Canada and Mexico. Dr. Kilroy explains that hemispheric security can only move forward based on the principles of shared threat perceptions and increasing economic and political cooperation.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.publisherCenter for Homeland Defense and Securityen_US
dc.titlePerimeter Defense and Regional Security Cooperation in North America United States, Canada, and Mexicoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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