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dc.contributor.authorBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.contributor.otherCenter for Contemporary Conflict
dc.dateMarch 2003
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-11T00:06:26Z
dc.date.available2013-01-11T00:06:26Z
dc.date.issued2003-03
dc.identifier.citationStrategic Insights, v.2, issue 3 (March 2003)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/25392
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Strategic Insights (March 2003), v.2 no.3en_US
dc.description.abstractOne year after the formal end of the failed peace process which had been initiated by President Andres Pastrana in 1998, it is possible to take stock of the situation of conflict in Colombia and the prospects for the future. The government of President Alvaro Uribe, who took office on August 7, 2002, is seeking to end the conflict by fighting the terrorists to force them to negotiate. To reach this point required serious modifications in domestic and international politics. This document explains why ongoing changes in domestic politics, including in Colombian civil-military relations, are required to keep pursuing this strategy.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStrategic Insights, v.2, issue 3 (March 2003)
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStrategic Insights
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleColombia: Conflict and Civil-Military Relations; Strategic Insights: v.2, issue 3 (March 2003)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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