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dc.contributor.authorReeves, Jeremy
dc.contributor.otherCenter for Contemporary Conflict (CCC)
dc.dateSummer 2011
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-11T00:06:35Z
dc.date.available2013-01-11T00:06:35Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/25454
dc.descriptionThis article appeared in Strategic Insights (Summer 2011), v.10 no.2, p.48-50en_US
dc.description.abstract"The daring raid on the compound in Abbottabad by our country's most elite servicemen has been widely touted as a tremendous success both here and abroad. However, to believe the United States is more secure after the death of Osama bin Laden (OBL) is a naive notion. Osama the man is dead, but his legacy lives on. Al Qaeda [AQ] was never about one man. While OBL played an important role in the attacks of September 11th, scores of others were involved, including OBL's recently named successor, Ayman al-Zawahiri. Furthermore, there is essentially no evidence linking OBL to the most notorious attacks since, the Madrid railway bombings in 2004 and the London bombings in 2005. His death may have come as a blow to AQ's leadership, but there are others both willing and able to pick up his mantle of Islamic extremism and continue to terrorize the West."en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStrategic Insights (Summer 2011), v.10 no.2, p.48-50
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStrategic Insights
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Legacy of bin Laden and National Security; Strategic Insights v.10, issue 2 (Summer 2011)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateCenter for Contemporary Conflict
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California


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