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dc.contributor.advisorPowell, S.C
dc.contributor.authorHayman, Douglass F.
dc.contributor.authorOtto, Harold H.
dc.dateMay 1962
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-23T21:56:20Z
dc.date.available2013-01-23T21:56:20Z
dc.date.issued1962-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/26138
dc.descriptionThis thesis document was issued under the authority of another institution, not NPS. At the time it was written, a copy was added to the NPS Library Collection for reasons not now known. It has been included in the digital archive for its historical value to NPS. Not believed to be a CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) title.
dc.description.abstractThe optimum naval propulsion plant is considered to be the one with the least total weight of machinery plus fuel. Perturbations of a modern destroyer propulsion cycle, with standard equipment components, are considered. Boiler pressure, condenser pressure , low pressure turbine exhaust annulus area, condenser surface, and leaving loss are considered variable. Equations are derived which express the variations in weight of important components. Availability balance methods are .applied in order to relate component efficiencies to fuel weight. Theoretical and numerical proof is given that leaving loss can be optimized on the basis of minimum turbine and condenser weight, independent of the rest of the cycle. This reduces the computations necessary in "brute force" analysis by an order of magnitude . As an example of the method, an availability balance is made for DLG-6 at cruising condition. Using 1050 F steam, boiler pressures from 800 psia to 1600 psia, and a broad range of condenser-L.P. turbine combinations, best parameters are found for ranges of 3*000, 5 $000, 7^000, and 10,000 miles „ Optimum condenser pressure is found to be fairly constant at 1.35" Hg. Abs., for the cruising condition and 75 F cooling water. The example studied indicates that standardization of naval propulsion plants at 1200 psia is on the high side of the optimum.
dc.description.urihttp://www.archive.org/details/optimizationofna00haym
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.subject.lcshNaval architectureen_US
dc.titleOptimization of Naval propulsion machineryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.departmentNaval Architecture and Marine Engineering
etd.thesisdegree.nameDegree of Naval Engineeren_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelProfessional Degreeen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNaval Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNaval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US


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