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dc.contributor.advisorBrutzman, Don P.
dc.contributor.advisorBlais, Curtis L.
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Patrick Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:35:50Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:35:50Z
dc.date.issued2006-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2645
dc.description.abstractThe individuals charged with the task of planning, developing and implementing force protection measures both at the unit and installation level must consider numerous factors in formulating the best defensive posture. Currently, force protection professionals utilize multiple sources of information regarding capabilities of systems that are available, and combine that knowledge with the requirements of their installation to create an overall plan. A crucial element missing from this process is the ability to determine, prior to system procurement, the most effective combination of systems and employment for a wide range of possible terrorist attack scenarios. This thesis is inspired by the work done by James Harney, LT, USN (2003). The thesis will expand the Anti-Terrorism Force Protection Tool developed during the original thesis by including the capability of testing force protection measures in multiple scenarios by utilizing models of force protection equipment and forces, virtual worlds of existing naval facilities, and terrorist agents that exhibit intent and behavioral characteristics which can test the effectiveness of the force protection equipment used. The result of this work is a scalable and repeatable methodology for generating large-scale, agent-based simulations for AT/FP problem domains providing 3D visualization, report generation, and statistical analysis.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/evaluatingeffect109452645
dc.format.extentxxii, 183 p. : col. ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMethodologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshTerrorismen_US
dc.subject.lcshGraphic artsen_US
dc.subject.lcshStatisticsen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshVirtual realityen_US
dc.subject.lcshPreventionen_US
dc.titleEvaluating the effectiveness of waterside security alternatives for force protection of Navy ships and installations using X3D graphics and agent-based simulationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentModeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES)
dc.identifier.oclc72856411
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineModeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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