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dc.contributor.advisorWirtz, James
dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorSine, Jack L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:35:52Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:35:52Z
dc.date.issued2006-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2656
dc.description.abstractDespite the political impetus for greater multilateralism in international military operations, recent coalitions including U.S. forces reflect a trend toward increasing U.S. dominance and decreasing allied participation. As the United States continues to invest in its military with research, development and acquisition budgets at least double that of any other nation, it fields technologies so advanced with respect to its allies as to leave them incompatible for combined operations. Recent coalition operations suggest that there is a close relationship between technological asymmetries created by partner contributions and the structures formed as the coalition assembles. Using Desert Storm and Operation Allied Force as case studies, this thesis identifies a systemic relationship between technological advantage and coalition dominance. As a coalition seeks to reduce aggregate risk, it relies on technologies that offer the greatest effectiveness. This reliance causes the coalition to divert combat burden to the technologically dominant partner which, in turn, imposes its operational culture. This thesis concludes that the technological transformation currently underway in the U.S. Department of Defense conflicts with U.S. political initiatives to promote greater multilateralism in combat operations by forcing allies to rely on U.S. technologies thereby creating more unilateral operations.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/organizingfightt109452656
dc.format.extentxvi, 93 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTechnology assessmenten_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary art and scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshCultureen_US
dc.subject.lcshPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.titleOrganizing the fight technological determinants of coalition command and control and combat operationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.oclc72850860
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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