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dc.contributor.advisorSimeral, Robert
dc.contributor.advisorBergin, Richard
dc.contributor.authorTindall, James A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:35:53Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:35:53Z
dc.date.issued2006-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2664
dc.descriptionCHDS State/Localen_US
dc.description.abstractAdaptive terrorist organizational structure and the lack of intelligence sharing were to blame for terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Because terrorist groups are moving toward a less predictable, but more diverse, dynamic, and fluid structure, effective combativeness of terrorism requires fighting terrorists with a network. This network must be capable of collecting and sharing credible, reliable and corroborative information on an unprecedented scale, transcending geographic, agency, and political boundaries. This thesis demonstrates utilization of a network-theory approach for sharing information, which will be argued, can provide insight into the system dynamics of the U.S. IC because it allows a systematic, comparative analysis of the system representation and fundamental problems associated with information sharing. The problems associated with past intelligence failures can be overcome with such a system because the use of a dedicated, nationally networked system will allow completion of three primary tasks: (1) examination of the strength of criminal/terrorist connections, (2) identification of suspects and mapping of networks, and (3) prediction of future behavior and better likelihood of prevention, response, and prosecution. A dedicated national networked intelligence-sharing system called DNIN (Dedicated National Intelligence Network), including geographic areas, regional centers, personnel, computer IT networks, and policy options is discussed.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/applyingnetworko109452664
dc.format.extentxxiv, 160 p. : col. maps ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary intelligenceen_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary art and scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshTerrorismen_US
dc.subject.lcshPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshCivil defenseen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleApplying network theory to develop a dedicated national intelligence networken_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.description.serviceScientist, U.S. Department of the Interioren_US
dc.identifier.oclc72838292
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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