Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMinami, Nathan A.
dc.date4/1/2010
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T17:22:07Z
dc.date.available2013-01-28T17:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-01
dc.identifier.citationCulture and Conflict Review (Spring 2010), v.4 no.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/27367
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Culture and Conflict Review (Spring 2010), v.4 no.1en_US
dc.description.abstract"With the recent decision to send an additional 30,000 troops to Afghanistan, there is little doubt that the stakes are increasing as America enters its ninth year of war. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the additional troops and associated increase in funding will produce decisive results. Indeed, if the last eight years in Afghanistan are an indicator, the situation is likely to get much worse before it improves. Therefore, it is critical that the additional assets being allocated to continue the fight in Afghanistan be employed in a manner that produces optimal results in creating stability. This paper will show that the key to determining the most optimal employment of assets is to first ensure that the problem is well defined and understood. There are three fundamental topics that are important to understanding the current problem in Afghanistan. First, it is clear that despite a gradual increase in funding for the war in Afghanistan over the last eight years, overall stability in the country is getting worse. A second aspect of the problem is that resources have not been managed in an effective manner: a problem further compounded by rampant corruption. Finally, there have been many costly individual programs initiated by the U.S. in Afghanistan that contributed very little to stability, and in some cases, fostered instability. This has resulted in a poor cost-benefit ratio for U.S. taxpayers."en_US
dc.publisherNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisherProgram for Culture and Conflict Studiesen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding the Problem in Afghanistan A Plan for Stabilityen_US
dc.contributor.corporateProgram for Culture & Conflict Studies


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record