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dc.contributor.authorVan Wagoner, Jarad
dc.date11/1/2009
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T17:22:09Z
dc.date.available2013-01-28T17:22:09Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-01
dc.identifier.citationCulture and Conflict Review (Fall 2009), v.3 no.3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/27374
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Culture and Conflict Review (Fall 2009), v.3 no.3en_US
dc.description.abstract"This article will explore the level of development through the prism of health capital and its relationship to democracy. Particularly, it will look at the claim made by Rashid that the marginalization of the FATA [Federally Administered Tribal Areas] stems from a lack of political involvement, or democratic freedoms. A short summary of the concept of health capital and why it is important will be presented. Next, the article will compare indicators of health capital in FATA and greater Pakistan. This will be followed by examples offering a glimpse of the correlation between health capital and democratic freedoms. Finally, it will explore other factors which may contribute to the low level of health capital in the FATA."en_US
dc.publisherNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisherProgram for Culture and Conflict Studiesen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleFederally Administered Tribal Areas A Case Study in Health Capital and Democracyen_US
dc.contributor.corporateProgram for Culture & Conflict Studies


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