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dc.contributor.authorCCS Research Staff
dc.date3/1/2008
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T17:22:11Z
dc.date.available2013-01-28T17:22:11Z
dc.date.issued2008-03-01
dc.identifier.citationCulture and Conflict Review (March 2008), v.2 no.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/27387
dc.descriptionThis article was published in Culture and Conflict Review (March 2008), v.2 no.2en_US
dc.description.abstract"The last six weeks has brought some of the worst violence in Afghanistan since 2001. In 2007, there were more than 230 Improvised Explosive Device (IED) attacks and 145 suicide attacks. Casualty rates were at least 25 percent higher in 2007 than the previous year. In the past 18 months, IED attacks have targeted numerous police and army busses, a group of legislators outside a factory at Baghlan, a five-star hotel in Kabul, and a Canadian convoy near a busy marketplace. The trends show that attacks are increasing in number and becoming more violent and dreadful to the Afghan population."en_US
dc.publisherNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.publisherProgram for Culture and Conflict Studiesen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleSuicide Attacks on the Riseen_US
dc.contributor.corporateProgram for Culture & Conflict Studies


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