Publication:
Arbitrary budget cuts and the U.S. national security posture

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Authors
McCaleb, Clyde J., III
Subjects
U.S. budget process
U.S. national security
Needed changes to the U.S. budget process
PPBS
Long-range defense strategy
Industrial base
The Federal deficit
Gramm-Rudman Hollings
Stabilization of defense spending
Advisors
Looney, Robert E.
Date of Issue
1990-12
Date
December 1990
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis examines the problems confronting the decision-makers today as they are forced to make tough budgetary decisions affecting the U.S. national security posture. Due to the dramatic changes occurring throughout the world, particularly in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, there is growing pressure upon Congress to reduce defense expenditures and realize a 'peace dividend'. The danger to U.S. national security lies not within the cuts themselves, but rather, within arbitrary budget cuts implemented to appease the American public and realizes a quick 'peace dividend'. Both the executive and legislative branches of government must consider the impact of current changes in defense spending on the long-range U.S. defense posture. This first requires a consensus between both branches of government on exactly what the future U.S. defense strategy should be, a dilemma made more difficult due to their political differences. The planning methods used by the Office of Management and Budget and the Department of Defense must become more realistic, and the budgetary perspective and practice of Congress must become more long-range in scope. The U.S. must learn to operate more efficiently with less resources, while maintaining an adequate U.S. national security posture.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
ix, 129 p. ill.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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