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dc.contributor.advisorYost, David S.
dc.contributor.authorAerandir, Mate Wesley
dc.dateDec-2012
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:13:13Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/27780
dc.descriptionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractWhile war in the Arctic appears unlikely at present, this thesis analyzes why an escalation of territorial and resource disputes in the Arctic up to and including the use of force cannot and should not be ruled out. This thesis examines the political, economic, and military interests of the main Arctic powers: Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia, and the United States to set the scene for an assessment of the factors that could make for cooperation or conflict. Advocates of a Pax Arctica involving regional cooperation underrate the more pragmatic and competitive factors underlying international relations and the actual limits of international institutions and economic interdependence in restraining behavior in an anarchic system. The potential for U.S.-Russian maritime conflict in the region is genuine. Based on the methodology established for this analysis, it can be reasonably assessed that conflict in the Arctic is likely. No time horizon can be determined, however, because much depends on decisions made (or not made) by these same Arctic powers in the coming decades.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/breakingicepoten1094527780
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.titleBreaking the ice: potential U.S.-Russian maritime conflict in the Arcticen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderUnrein, L. Tim
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorArcticen_US
dc.subject.authorConflicten_US
dc.subject.authorEconomic Interdependenceen_US
dc.subject.authorInternational Institutionalismen_US
dc.subject.authorThreaten_US
dc.subject.authorEconomic Warfareen_US
dc.subject.authorNavyen_US
dc.subject.authorCoast Guarden_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorRussiaen_US
dc.subject.authorCanadaen_US
dc.subject.authorDenmarken_US
dc.subject.authorNorwayen_US
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Nations Convention on the Law of the Seaen_US
dc.subject.authorUNCLOSen_US
dc.subject.authorCommission on the Limits of the Continental Shelfen_US
dc.subject.authorCLCSen_US
dc.subject.authorNATOen_US
dc.subject.authorNATO-Russia Councilen_US
dc.subject.authorNRCen_US
dc.subject.authorArctic Councilen_US
dc.subject.authorHydrocarbonen_US
dc.subject.authorOilen_US
dc.subject.authorGasen_US
dc.subject.authorArms Raceen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US


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