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dc.contributor.advisorBarma, Naazneen H.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Robert K.
dc.dateDec-12
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:14:01Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:14:01Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/27906
dc.description.abstractThis study is about discovering to what extent China uses its rare earth element policies as a tool of economic statecraft. With Chinas virtual monopoly on this resource and the United States increasingly growing demand, it is necessary to examine how China intends on using its economic power. The study builds a comparative framework using both structural realism and neoliberal institutionalism, by identifying theory predictions in terms of Chinas strategic intent and the specific policies it might employ in the rare earth element sector. Specifically, the study finds that Beijing has and will continue to use its rare earth policies as a tool of economic statecraft, but with restraint. Despite its present reliance on economic interdependence with the United States, as China continues to modernize the structure of its economy, more statecraft interventions will likely occur. Beijing was successful in utilizing its rare earth policies as a tool of economic statecraft both by influencing the behavior of its international and its domestic commercial actors. China will leverage its near-monopoly on the rare earths industry by continuing to aggressively employ policies that meet its long-term strategic objectives.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/chinasrareearthp1094527906
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.titleChina's rare earth policies: economic statecraft or interdependence?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWeiner, Robert J.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorEconomic Statecraften_US
dc.subject.authorRare Earth Elementsen_US
dc.subject.authorStructural Realismen_US
dc.subject.authorNeo-liberal Institutionalismen_US
dc.subject.authorInterdependence.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, And The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, And The Pacific)en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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