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dc.contributor.advisorMasubuchi, Koichi
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, William Carl
dc.dateMay 1978
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:30:33Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:30:33Z
dc.date.issued1978-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/28044
dc.descriptionThis thesis document was issued under the authority of another institution, not NPS. At the time it was written, a copy was added to the NPS Library Collection for reasons not now known. It has been included in the digital archive for its historical value to NPS. Not believed to be a CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) title.
dc.description.abstractThere is a great interest in the strength of fillet welds because the welding operation accounts for about 30% of the labor cost in planning and constructing ship hulls. One way to reduce welding cost is to reduce the required weld size. Background information is obtained by reviewing the major experimental and theoretical work in the areas of static strength, fatigue strength , and shear strength of fillet welds. In order to appreciate the conditions in the real world, design considerations, fabrication considerations, and corrosion considerations are discussed. Typical joints from existing U.S. Navy ships are employed to obtain detailed geometry and local loading information to be used as input for a computer model which was developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology which uses the finite element method for determining the static strength for fillet welds. In one particular joint a reduction of 30% in the required weld size is justified. A future system for analyzing fillet weld strength is proposed and explained by the use of an example, The economics of intermittent and continuous welds are examined, and the economic impact that a reduction in the required fillet weld size would have on ship construction cost is estimated.
dc.description.sponsorshipShip Structure Committee, Project SR-1248 "Updating of fillet weld strength parameters for shipbuilding" DOT-CG-71455-A
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/acomparisonoffil1094528044
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCambridge, Massachusetts; Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNaval architectureen_US
dc.titleA comparison of fillet weld strength and U.S. Navy design specifications for non-combatant ships and the economic implicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.departmentOcean Engineering
dc.subject.authorFillet weld strength
dc.subject.authorFillet weld
dc.subject.authorWeld strength
dc.subject.authorNavy design specifications
dc.subject.authorNon-combatant ships
etd.thesisdegree.nameDegree of Ocean Engineeren_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Shipping and Shipbuilding Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelProfessional Degreeen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOcean Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineShippingen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineShipbuilding Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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