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dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, Glenn
dc.contributor.authorKruse, James H.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:31:03Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:31:03Z
dc.date.issued1994-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/28116
dc.description.abstractThis thesis attempts to explain the origin of state behavior in international politics. It compares the arguments of state level theorists who emphasize the decisive role that internal attributes, including domestic politics, political elite and regime ideology, to that of structuralists, who focus on the decisive impact of the structure of the international system. The difference is crucial: do we examine domestic politics in order to predict state behavior in international affairs or do we assume that any state, given its place in the international system, will act similarly without regard to these internal factors? The case study examined is Iran, from the early 1960s to 1989. During this period, the international system remained bi-polar, dominated by the U.S.-U.S.S.R. rivlary. The internal attributes of Iran changed radically, however, as a result of its 1979 revolution. With such a fundamental shift, state level theorists would expect a radical change in Iranian foreign policy. With the continuity of the international system, structuralists would expect essential continuity in Iran's external behavior. This thesis shows that despite rhetorical changes, Iranian foreign policy remained fundamentally the same under the Shah and the Ayatollah. The structural approach is a more useful guide to understanding state behavioren_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/determinantsofir1094528116
dc.format.extent116 p.;28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.titleDeterminants of Iranian foreign policy : the impact of systemic, domestic and ideologic factorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderStockton, Paul
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.schoolNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorInternational Relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorForeign Policyen_US
dc.subject.authorIranen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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