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dc.contributor.advisorBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.contributor.authorLasher, David Brian
dc.dateJune 1991
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:31:24Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:31:24Z
dc.date.issued1991-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/28163
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to examine what role, if any, the United States can play in encouraging democratic transitions. It is a comparison of some of the different approaches the United States used in its relations with three countries in which it had varying amounts of influence: Chile (some influence), Brazil (relatively little influence), and El Salvador (relatively major influence). The two most fundamental questions it asks are: what would be the best policy for the United States to follow should it decide to encourage a democratic transition in any given country? And assuming a coherent approach, how much of an impact are United States' efforts likely to have? In reference to the first questions, this study finds that a bipartisan foreign policy, prudently using the various instruments at its disposal, is the best course for the United States to follow. As for the second questions, the United States can have an impact on democratic transitions, but that impact is likely to be quite limited in comparison to the influence of other factors (historical, cultural, social, economic, and political) within that country. As such, increase involvement does not necessarily increase the ability of the United States to encourage a democratic transition. It is, in effect, a problematic impact.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/encouragingdemoc00lash
dc.format.extent165 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleEncouraging democratic transitions: the problematic impact of United States' involvementen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderTollefson, Scott D.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorBrazilen_US
dc.subject.authorChileen_US
dc.subject.authorDemocracyen_US
dc.subject.authorEl Salvadoren_US
dc.subject.authorPolitical transitionsen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited States foreign policyen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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