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dc.contributor.advisorJung, Glenn H.
dc.contributor.authorMason, J. Robert
dc.dateDecember 1978
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:32:42Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:32:42Z
dc.date.issued1978-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/28346
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited
dc.description.abstractIn this report classic dynamic height calculations were made from International Geophysical Year (1957-1958) and adjacent 1959 oceanographic data to obtain geostrophic currents and estimates of mass, salt, and heat transports in the South Atlantic Ocean. The cross sections extend from South America to Africa along the 8°S, 16 °S, 24 °S, and 32 °S latitude lines , providing temperature and salinity data from the surface to near bottom. A level of no motion was determined by establishing mass and salt continuity across each of the latitudinal cross sections. This level varied from 1100 meters at 8°S to 1270 meters at 32 °S. It is approximated by the 27.57 sigma-t surface and corresponds closely to the boundary between the Antarctic Intermediate Water and the South Atlantic Deep Water masses. The resulting meridional heat transport was then examined and compared with other estimates . Northward (equatorward) heat transports resulted at each latitude , which would seem to oppose the conventional view of the role of the ocean in the earth's heat budget as a means to transfer heat from equator to poles. However, the northward direction of the net absolute heat transport agrees with the consensus of previous work and is attributed to the warmer surface currents with a net northward transport dominating the cooler deeper currents and their net southward flow. A general circulation pattern was developed from mass transport values for each of three layers of water: Upper, Intermediate, and Deep and Bottom Water. These derived circulation patterns are then compared to general descriptive circulation patterns found in the literature. General agreement was found with the notable exception of lacking a strong Brazil current in the surface and central waters. Vertical cross sections of velocity, mass, salt, and heat transport were contoured to examine the eddy field circulation pattern and further describe general circulation patterns.
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Research under #N00014-78-WR-80032
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/masssaltheattran00maso
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
dc.subject.lcshOceanographyen_US
dc.titleMass, salt, and heat transportation across four latitude circles in the south Atlantic Ocean.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreadervon Schwind, J.J.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentOceanography
dc.subject.authorSouth Atlantic Ocean
dc.subject.authorgeneral circulation
dc.subject.authorheat transport
dc.subject.authormass transport
dc.subject.authorsalt transport
dc.subject.authorgeostrophic ocean currents
dc.subject.authorlevel of no motion
dc.description.funderOffice of Naval Research under #N00014-78-WR-80032
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navy
dc.identifier.npsreportNPS 68-78-007
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Meteorology and Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMeteorology;Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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