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dc.contributor.advisorLarson, Harold J.
dc.contributor.authorMatos, Rafael E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T23:34:32Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T23:34:32Z
dc.date.issued1994-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/28635
dc.description.abstractThe United States Navy Recruiting Command (NAVCRUITCOM) manages the Navy's most important procurement process, the acquisition of personnel to man all Navy activities. In this process, NAVCRUITCOM policies allow potential recruits to delay their accession date for up to 365 days from the time the recruiting contract is signed through the Delayed Entry Program (DEP). One of the major disadvantages of the DEP is that an individual may decide not to enlist, becoming a 'DEP Loss'. This study investigates the relationship between the time an individual spends in DEP and the risk of becoming a DEP loss or leaving the service during the first two years of enlistment; log-linear regression models are discussed and recommendations are made using conditional probabilities. It was found that, on the average, DEP attrition is directly proportional to the length of DEP, while first term attrition decreases with DEP length for DEP time of eight months or less. The time an individual spends in the DEP has a larger effect on attrition during the DEP itself than it does on attrition after the contract accesses. It was also found that Non-High School Graduate males have the highest attrition proportions after completing DEP than any other groupen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/usnavysdelayeden00mato
dc.format.extent72 p.;28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshOperations Researchen_US
dc.titleU.S. Navy's Delayed Entry Program : effects of its length on DEP loss and first term attritionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNA
dc.contributor.schoolNA
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclco640600128
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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