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dc.contributor.authorLooney, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-05T19:03:16Z
dc.date.available2013-03-05T19:03:16Z
dc.date.issued2002-06-01
dc.identifier.citationStrategic Insights, v.1, issue 4 (June 2002)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/29626
dc.description.abstractFollowing the September 11 terrorist attacks the United States has revamped many of its foreign aid programs. Prior to that date the administration's top foreign aid initiatives for the 2002 fiscal year had been combating the spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, fighting poverty, broadening the public/private partnership in aid programming, and expanding the counter-narcotics campaign in the Andean region. These issues, while still a concern, have taken a back seat to the war on terrorism.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStrategic Insights, v.1, issue 4 (June 2002)
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStrategic Insights
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleRebuilding Afghanistan, Strategic Insighten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateCenter for Contemporary Conflict
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairsen_US


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