Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Lyman
dc.contributor.advisorAbenheim, Donald
dc.contributor.authorAmerling, Leah
dc.dateMarch 2002
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:36:51Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:36:51Z
dc.date.issued2002-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/2983
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis study provides a comparative analysis of Russia and China's transformation by focusing on two aspects: the impact of reform efforts on economic performance and the prospect for democracy. China's domestic modernization centered on economic reform, whereas Russia's deliberately included both political and economic dimensions. Such approaches have set Russia toward economic decline and China on a path to economic power. Additionally, the author finds that Russia's overnight transition to a liberalized regime allowed for the consolidation of political and economic structures, marked by elite control and corruption that obstruct democracy's progress. In contrast, China's reforms, implemented under an authoritarian regime, have created unintended spillover effects in the ideological, political, and social spheres of the polity, which collectively, are providing the forward momentum toward a transition to a liberalized regime. The author determines that the unique nature of these polities has direct implications for U.S. foreign policy. In regards to Russia, U.S. policy will need to take into account the constraints that Russia's corrupt polity places on efficacy of international assistance. In regards to China, whatever policy the United States adopts, it will need to calculate how its policies advance or retard the domestic evolution underway in China and the impact the United States can/may have on the process.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/russiandchinaimp109452983
dc.format.extentx, 61 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleRussia and China: the impact of reform and the prospect of democracyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record