Publication:
Naval Postgraduate School NPSAT1 Small Satellite

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Authors
Sakoda, Daniel
Horning, James A.
Moseley, Steven D.
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2006-09
Date
25-29 September 2006
Publisher
Language
en_US
Abstract
The NPSAT1 mission, conceived and developed by the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG), is sponsored and executed by the DoD Space Test Program (SMC SDD). The small satellite is manifested for launch aboard the STP-1 Atlas V Mission due to launch in December 2006. The main objective of the NPSAT1 program is to provide educational opportunities for the offi cer students in the Space Systems Curricula at NPS through the design, testing, integration, and fl ight operations of a small satellite. The 82 kg (180 lbs) satellite will be earth-pointing using a novel, low-cost, 3-axis attitude control scheme. NPSAT1 will provide a platform for a number of spacecraft technology experiments, including a lithium-ion battery, a confi gurable, fault-tolerant processor (CFTP) experiment, and fl ight demonstrations of commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) components such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) rate sensors and a digital camera. The spacecraft command and data handling (C&DH) subsystem is NPS-designed, featuring low-power with error-detection-and-correction (EDAC) memory, an ARM720T microprocessor, and running Linux as the operating system. Two other experiments are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory to investigate ionospheric physics. This paper presents an overview of the spacecraft, its subsystems, and the challenges of a small satellite program in a university environment.
Type
Paper
Description
Paper presented at the ESA Small Satellite Systems and Services Symposium
Series/Report No
Department
Space Systems Academic Group
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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