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dc.contributor.advisorMcCormick, Gordon H.
dc.contributor.authorBender, William J.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Craig, L.
dc.dateDecember 1995
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T22:49:03Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T22:49:03Z
dc.date.issued1995-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/31274
dc.description.abstractInternal conflict is steadily increasing in importance. Whether it is called low intensity conflict or operations other than war, current conflict theories do not adequately explain the dynamics of internal conflict nor provide clear prescriptive policy guidance. This thesis serves two purposes. The first is to provide a model to analyze and describe internal conflict dynamics. The second is to provide decision makers with a strategic, systemic framework to successfully conduct internal war. The thesis is divided into four sections. The first examines internal conflict theories and develops a model. The second tests the model in 3 case studies demonstrating the explanatory effectiveness of the model. The third looks at the theoretical and practical implications of the model for an external actor such as the United States. The fourth section concludes the study and highlights policy prescriptions. A systemic approach to internal war provides policy makers at the NSC, DOD and DOS with a useful and objective decision making tool.en_US
dc.format.extent233 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLow-intensity conflicts (Military science)en_US
dc.subject.lcshInsurgency.en_US
dc.titleHow men rebel: an organizational model for insurgencyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Army (USA) authorsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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