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dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Richard B.
dc.contributor.advisorGates, William R.
dc.contributor.authorDevinney, Edward William.
dc.dateDecember 1995
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T22:49:21Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T22:49:21Z
dc.date.issued1995-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/31300
dc.description.abstractThis thesis analyzes the financial feasibility of implementing a recycling program onboard U.S. Naval Combatants. Numerous laws and international agreements provide the impetus for the Navy to make drastic changes in its solid waste management practices. This study focuses primarily on revenues generated from the sale of aluminum and tin, as they compose the most significant portions of a ship's recyclable waste stream. Specific factors investigated include storage limitations, sanitation concerns, manpower issues, cost constraints, lack of training, lack of incentives, tangible benefits, and perceived benefits. Research was conducted onboard four classes of U.S. Naval Combatants: Arleigh Burke Class Destroyers, Oliver Hazard Perry Class Frigates, Spruance Class Destroyers, and Ticonderoga Class Cruisers. Usage data for both tin and aluminum were gathered from each ship type to determine required storage volumes and potential revenues from the sale of the recyclables. A thorough space inspection was conducted of each ship type to ascertain potential storage spaces and their suitability for temporary storage while underway. Specific findings are that there is adequate storage room aboard these ships, that crews' quality of life will not be sacrificed, and that there exists potential for significant revenues by selling the recyclable cans, all of which are retained by the ship. More generally, it is shown that it is cost-effective to implement an aluminum and tin recycling program onboard U.S. Naval Combatants.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/costbenefitnalys1094531300
dc.format.extent125 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleCost-benefit analysis of implementing an aluminum and tin recycling program onboard United States Naval Combatantsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFinancial Management
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Financial Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineFinancial Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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